Index

Pictures

Buckeye Furnace Buckeye Furnace Company Store
Buckeye Furnace Buckeye Furnace Company Store
Storage Shed Charging House Beam Scale & Charging Hopper Boilers & Charging Plate
Storage Shed Charging House Beam Scale & Charging Hopper Boilers & Charging Plate
Hot Blast Stove Boilers RH Tuyere Retaining Wall
Hot Blast Stove Boilers RH Tuyere Retaining Wall

Description & Operation

Buckeye Furnace has been fully restored by the Ohio Historical Society. The site includes the complete furnace, including boilers and the engine room. Also on site is a fully restored storage shed (where furnace charging supplies were kept), the company store, and the weighing scales. While the furnace itself is not operational, there are many signs posted throughout the site to explain the history and purpose of each furnace site element.

I have incorporated some basic descriptions about the operation of an iron furnace to this page.

An average HOT BLAST furnace in the Hanging Rock Iron Region (HRIR) would produce about 3000 tons of iron per year. This type of furnace required about 3.79 cords of wood, or 137 bushels of charcoal, per ton of iron produced. Therefore, a typical hot blast furnace required about 11,370 cords of wood to be cut per year. The hot blast furnace would consume 7,890 tons of raw iron ore per year.

In comparison, an average COLD BLAST furnace in the Hanging Rock Iron Region (HRIR) would produce about 2000 tons of iron per year. Cold blast furnaces required more fuel, needing about 5.84 cords of wood, or 215 bushels of charcoal, per ton of iron produced. Therefore, a typical cold blast furnace required about 11,680 cords of wood to be cut per year. The cold blast furnace would consume 5,260 tons of raw iron ore per year.

Virgin timberland yielded about 40 cords of wood per acre, while second growth forests produced 20 cords per acre. Most furnaces owned several thousand acres, and worked 200-600 acres per year. They generally planned on a 20-30 year renewal cycle for each area worked.

The ore was dug or lifted. In the HRIR region, a common practice was to scrape the top of a hill, cut the raw ore, and then "lift" the cut blocks onto a wagon. Fourteen to twenty-one men would work in the iron beds. When the dirt became 7-10 feet deep, it was deemed uneconomical to continue on the particular hill, and the miners would move to a new hill. Miners in the HRIR were generally paid $0.50-$1.00 per ton of ore dug(lifted). Furnaces paid $2.00-$4.00 for each ton of ore delivered to the furnace.

Portions of the information above were obtained from the Robert Ervin text.

First Visit: 4Q-2000

Last Visit: 4Q-2001



For more information on the operation of iron furnaces, visit:

History

Start of Operation: 1852 (Lesley reports 1853)

Blowout: 1894

Daily Tonnage: 12 Tons

Built By: Buckeye Furnace was constructed in 1851 by Thomas Price.

Stack: 34 feet w/11 foot bosh

Blast: Hot

Type: Charcoal

It was financed by Newkirk, Daniels, and Company under the name of Buckeye Furnace Company. It was built in 1851 and started operations in 1852. The furnace initially produced 7.5 tons of iron per day and operated on a 42 week operating cycle. The stack height was later increased, which permitted the furnace output to be increased to 12 tons per day.

In 1862 the furnace was sold to H.S. Bundy Company, who operated the site for two years. They then sold the furnace to Terry, Auston, and Company who operated the furnace until 1867. They sold the furnace to the Buckeye Furnace Company, whose principals were Eben Jones, John D. Davis, L.T. Hughes, an Dr. S. Williams. They operated the furnace until 1894, when the site went out of blast.

Some of the above information was obtained from Robert Ervin.

Per J.P. Lesley, the fn produced 1,840 tons of iron in fourty two weeks of 1855. The ore was horizontal limestone ore drawn from area coal measures. The fn was owned by Newkirk, Daniels, & Co. and managed by Warren Murfin.

Directions

From RT35 (Jackson, Ohio) take RT32 North/East (Appalacian Highway). Approximately 5 miles, turn Right onto State Route 124. Cross RT327 carefully, then continue on 124. A few miles down the road there is a sign posted directing visitors to the site. You will make a Right onto Buckeye Furnace Road, then drive about 1~2 miles south until the sign directs you to take another Right hand turn. The site will be on your left.

NOTE: In early spring, or after heavy rains, the Buckeye Furnace Road is subject to high water (flooding) conditions along bordering Raccoon Creek.

GPS - N39 03.369 W82 27.359 @779 feet

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